God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen


So today is one special day, Jane Austen’s 240th birthday! Yay!

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Jane Austen is one special woman who changed literary history with her amazing characters, plots, etc. She faced all kinds of adversity from living in poverty; losing the love of her life as his family felt she wasn’t in the same class; she continued to wait for her true love, although he never walked back into her life; Her first book she ever wrote was published post-mortem; her second novel and the most famous, Pride and Prejudice, was turned down several times before being published; etc.

But through this all she was able to preserve and create classic tales that have not only influenced literary history, but enriched the lives of so many readers.

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So as I am a huge fan

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I decided to dedicate this post to some of Austen’s greatest creations. Her Austen men.

Don't Stop Believing!

Don’t Stop Believing!

I’ve discussed the women in the past, so here we are with our lovely gentlemen that can rest at my house anytime.

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mr darcy

Ah I love you too, and I want to wish you a merry Christmas. Mr. Darcy, the man that makes women all over the world go ape. Starts off tall, dark, and brooding; but in the end becomes kind, sweet, and will do all he can to help the woman he loves.

“I sincerely hope your Christmas…may abound in the gaieties which the season generally brings…”

-Pride and Prejudice, pg 122

For more on Mr. Darcy, go to The Confession of Fitzwilliam Darcy

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ColonelBrandon

Colonel Brandon loved a women, but his parents drove them apart. When she went down a dark road and left a child, he cared for her as his own. He falls for Marianne, but when she chooses another man, he never tries to sway her or pressure her; but is instead is content as a friend of the family. His brimming kindness wins her heart.

For more on Colonel Brandon, go to A Bit Pottery About Jane Austen

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Edward-Ferrars-mr-edward-ferrarsSense&Sensibility

Edward Ferras has a lot of issues in standing up to his mother, along with being easily manipulated; but when he was told to break an engagement or lose his inheritance, he throws his money to the wind, choosing loyalty. His fiancé proves to be unworthy of such devotion, and Edward finds true love with Elinor.

“I remember last Christmas…danced from eight o’clock to four, without once sitting down.”

Sense and Sensibility, pg 30

For more on Edward Ferras, go to To Edward or Not to Edward?

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mr-knightley1

Mr. Knightley starts out as the best friend, trying to assist Emma in everything and being there; but never using their history to try and push her into marriage. He is content to sit on the sidelines and just be a part of Emma’s life, as little or as much as she wants him in it. He always cares about Emma being the best she can be; calling her out on the things she screws up on, but encouraging and praising those she does well.

At Christmas every body invites their friends and thinks little of even the worst weather.”

-Emma, pg 97

For more on Mr. Knightley, go to Mr. Knightley’s Diary

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jjfeildhenrytilney

Ah Mr. Tilney. Unlike the other Austen men, Mr. Tilney breaks tradition; speaking to Catherine without an introduction, teasing, and allowing his genial nature to push through the rigorous rules of society. He falls for Catherine, believing her to be a perfect match for him (and rich.) When he finds out that he was mislead about her finances, he wants to marry her anyway; risking disinheritance for the woman he loves.

…last Christmas–the very first moment I beheld him–my heart was irrecoverably gone.”

-Northanger Abbey, pg 142

For more on Mr. Tilney, go to It’s All Jane Austen’s Fault

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Frederick Wentworth

Captain Wentworth fell for the woman of his dreams, but when she was persuaded not to marry him, as he wasn’t as wealthy as she was, he ran off to the military taking all kinds of risks and increasing his fortune. He returns and finds the woman he once loved, preparing to ignore her and not involve himself with her in anyway. But he quickly recognizes that his feelings for her are as strong as ever, risking his heart again.

On one side was a table occupied by chattering girls, cutting up silk and gold paper; and on the other were tressels and trays, bending under the weight of brawn and cold pies, where riotous boys were holding high revel; the whole completed by a roaring Christmas fire…”

 Persuasion, pg 80

For more on Captain Wentworth, go to A Letter of Love: Persuasion (2007)

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For more on Jane Austen, go to Jane, Jane, Jane: A Jane Austen Biography

For more on Pride & Prejudice, go to Darcy’s Story: Pride and Prejudice Told From a Whole New Perspective

For more on Sense and Sensibility, go to The Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries

For more on Emma, go to Unsung Austen Men: Mr. Weston

For more on Northanger Abbey, go to Opening With…

For more on Persuasion, go to On the 10th Day ‘Til Christmas: Merry Christmas from the Austen Novels

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And to close us out we have the Christmas Carol, God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen. This is one of the oldest Christmas carols, stating back to the 16th century.

I love the deep music and just how powerful the song feels when you hear and sing it.

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For more Christmas Carols, go to Joy to the World

 

 

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