Return of the Retellings: Pride & Prejudice, cont.

So most of you are like, what is this? A post on the many retellings of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice? Don’t we have a post on that?

What??

Yes, but the problem is that there are just sooooooooo many books and films based on Pride and Prejudice…

Or read it, or watch it.

I decided that instead of doing an endless list, I would do a post of thirty, then make another post with thirty. To see the first installment of Pride and Prejudice works I have reviewed, click here: Happy Birthday Pride and Prejudice.

The second post is The Retellings Strike Back, and has the next thirty posts.

But now to the next thirty (subject to change)…

Books:

Duty & Desire (Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman #2) by Pamela Aiden

These Three Remain (Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman #2) by Pamela Aiden

The Darcys & the Bingleys: A Tale of Two Gentlemen’s Marriages to Two Most Devoted Sisters by Marsha Altman

Georgiana and the Wolf: Pride and Prejudice Continued by Marsha Altman

Pied and Prodigious by D. M. Andrews

The Trials of the Honorable F. Darcy by Sara Angelini

Mrs. Darcy’s Dilemma: A Sequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice by Diana Birchall

Recollections of Rosings (The Pemberley Chronicles #8) by Rebecca Ann Collins

Mr. Darcy’s Daughters by Elizabeth Edmondson

Disappointed Hopes (A Fair Prospect #1) by Cassandra Grafton

Darcy’s Dilemma (A Fair Prospect #2) by Cassandra Grafton

Dear Mr. Darcy: A Retelling of Pride and Prejudice by Amanda Grange

Mr. Darcy, Vampyre by Amanda Grange

Mr. Wickham’s Diary by Amanda Grange

Pride and Pyramids: Mr. Darcy in Egypt by Amanda Grange and Jacqueline Webb

The Journey by Jan Hahn

Pride and Popularity (The Jane Austen Diaries) by Jenni James

A Darcy Christmas by Sharon Lathan

Bluebells in the Morning by Karalynne Mackrory and Christina Boyd

Darcys of Derbyshire by Abigail Reynolds

Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star by Heather Lynn Rigaud

Lost in Austen: Create Your Own Austen Adventure by Emma Campbell Webster

 

Movies/TV:

Pride & Prejudice (1940)

Pride & Prejudice (1980)

Furst Impressions (1995)

Bride & Prejudice (2004)

Pride & Prejudice (2005)

Lost in Austen (2008)

Austenland (2013)

 

Other:

First Impressions (1959)

For more Pride and Prejudice, go to Dear William: Letters from Georgiana Darcy

The Magician’s Nephew Tea Party/Book Club: Lavender and Earl Grey Scones

So every Wednesday, starting in October, I have been a part of a Tea Party/Bible Study/Book Club on The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis. This is different from my book club and the Book Club Picks I have been reviewing (and desperately need to catch up on). The first week we had Cederberg Tea Company Rooibos + Ginger Tea, Cranberry-Spice Scones with Maple Cream, Tea Time Magazine’s Ham and Cheese Tea Sandwiches, Cucumber-Four Peppercorn Goat Cheese Canapés, Fotina & Pork Puffed Pastry, and Mini Apple Pies.

The second week we had Chami Spice Ginger Plum Tea, Dark Chocolate Ginger Scones, Curried Egg Salad Triple Stacks Sandwiches, Turkey-Apple Tea Sandwiches, Fotina Flower Puffed Pastry, and Lemon Gingerbread Cake.

The third week we had Organic India Tulsi Masala Chai Tea, Parmesan and Chive Scones, Cucumber Aioli Canapés, Ham, Cheddar, and Apple Tea Sandwiches, Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites, and Mini Pumpkin Crème Brûlée.

And now to the fourth week. This week we had Tiesta Tea Victorian Earl Grey, Lavender and Earl Grey Scones, Chicken Salad Sandwiches, Pinwheels, Hummus Tomato Salad, and Triple Berry Salad.

I couldn’t share the recipes in October as I was in the middle of Horrorfst IX, so I am catching up and of course we always start with scones.

This comes from Flour Covered Apron.

And something yummy to eat with it. 🙂

Ingredients for Earl Grey Lavender Scones:

  • 2 Cups of All Purpose Flour
  • 1/4 Cup of Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon of Baking Powder
  • 1/2 Teaspoon of Salt
  • 3 Tea Bags of Earl Grey Tea Blend or ~3 Teaspoons of Loose Leaf Earl Grey Tea
  • 1/2 Cup of Butter, Frozen
  • 1/2 Cup of Whipping Cream
  • 1 Large Egg
  • 2 Teaspoons Vanilla Extract

Ingredients for Earl Grey Lavender Glaze:

  • 1.5 Teaspoons Culinary Lavender, plus more for garnishing
  • 1/2 Cup of Milk
  • 2 Tea Bags or 2 Tsps of Loose Leaf Earl Grey
  • 1 1/4 Powdered Sugar

Directions for Scones:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Open the 3 tea bags and empty the ground tea leaves directly into the flour mixture-whisk to combine. If using loose leaf tea, grind it down so that it is smaller.
  4. Grate the frozen butter and cut it into the flour mixture, using the pastry cutter until incorporated and the mixture has the texture of fine crumbs.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk together the cream, egg, and vanilla extract.
  6. Make a well in the middle of the dry ingredients, then mix together.
  7. Once completely combined, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until it comes together.
  8. Shape the dough into a disc about 8 in in diameter.
  9. Slice into 8 wedges.
  10. Place the wedges about 2 inches apart on a lined baking sheet.
  11. Bake at 400 degrees F for 18-22 mins, or until scones are tall and golden brown.
  12. Transfer to wire rack to cool completely.

Directions for Glaze:

  1. In a small saucepan, bring the milk and lavender to a simmer.
  2. Remove from heat, then steep the two bags of Earl Grey teabags or loose leaf tea for about 7 mins.
  3. Using a small sieve, or infuser, strain the mixture and discard the lavender.
  4. Measure 1/4 cup of the steeped milk.
  5. Pour into a small bowl and whisk together with the powdered sugar. For a thicker glaze, add more powdered sugar until desired consistency and sweetness are reached.
  6. Once scones are cool, drizzle with glaze and sprinkle with lavender.

These were extremely delicious, espechially as my sister dried the lavender fresh from our garden. Everyone could not get enough of them.

For more from The Magician’s Nephew Tea Party/Book Club, go to Mini Pumpkin Crème Brûlée

For more recipes, go to Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites

For more Earl Grey Tea recipes, go to Lavender Earl Grey Tea Shortbread Cookies

For more scones, go to Parmesan and Chive Scones

For more tea posts, go to How the Queen Found the Perfect Cup of Tea

Dear William: Letters from Georgiana Darcy

Dear William: Letters from Georgiana Darcy (2020)

So back in July of 2020, I was celebrating my blogiversary, and on instagram I would ask Jane Austen questions and then post the responses the next day.

Hmm…?

One of the questions I asked was which Jane Austen supporting characters needed their own story? The answers were: John and Isabella Knightley (Emma), Miss Bates (Emma), Captain Benwick (Persuasion), the Admiral and Mrs. Croft (Persuasion), Colonel Brandon (Sense and Sensibility), and William Price (Mansfield Park)Sarah.with.an.h commented on my post that she thinks Georgiana Darcy needs her own story and shared that she had made a short video from Georgiana Darcy’s point of view, letters to her brother.

Georgiana Darcy from Death Comes to Pemberley.

I thanked her for sharing and planned to watch it, but you know me. I have so many plans and ideas, but life gets in the way…

Oh well…

I had thankfully screenshoted the comment so I wouldn’t forget who commented on it, and found it when I was going through my photos the other day and decided it was time to give it a watch.

In Dear William: Letters from Georgiana Darcy the Jane Austen story of Pride and Prejudice is set in modern times with Georgiana being sent to a boarding school and calling her brother William (Fitzwilliam); along with George Wickham.

I really enjoyed the short video as I think Sarah captured Georgiana’s sweetness, naivety, her inexperience, and how she was manipulated into believing she loved Wickham.

From Death Comes to Pemberley.

This video also showed the closeness of the Darcy siblings, but also as Darcy is her only immediate family and much older than her-at times he is also a fathr figure and Georgiana, like any teen girl, is rebelling a bit, pushing her boundaries.

I think it is worth a watch and if interested, click on this link.

For more on Georgiana Darcy, go to Marrying Mr. Darcy: The Pride and Prejudice Card Game

For more Pride and Prejudice, go to Achy Breaky Heart: Austentatious (2015)

For more Jane Austen film adaptions, go to Pride and Prejudice and Mistletoe (2018)

The Magician’s Nephew Tea Party/Book Club: Mini Pumpkin Crème Brûlée

So every Wednesday, starting in October, I have been a part of a Tea Party/Bible Study/Book Club on The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis. This is different from my book club and the Book Club Picks I have been reviewing (and desperately need to catch up on). I also need to catch up on these recipes. Week three we had Organic India Tulsi Masala Chai Tea, Parmesan and Chive Scones, Cucumber Aioli Canapés, Ham, Cheddar, and Apple Tea Sandwiches, Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites, and Mini Pumpkin Crème Brûlée.

I couldn’t share the recipes in October as I was in the middle of Horrorfest IX, so I am catching up and of course next is the dessert.

Let’s spill the tea.

This recipe comes from Better Homes & Garden.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Whipping Cream
  • 3 Egg Yolks, Lightly Beaten
  • 2 Eggs, Lightly Beaten
  • 1/2 Cup of Sugar
  • 1/2 Cup of Canned Pumpkin
  • 1 Teaspoon of Ground Cinnamon
  • 1 Teaspoon of Ground Ginger
  • 1/4 Teaspoon of Salt
  • 1/4 Teaspoon of Ground Cloves
  • 10 Baby Pumpkins
  • 1/4 Cup of Sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a small saucepan, heat whipping cream over medium heat until bubbly.
  3. Remove from heat; set aside
  4. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine egg yolks, eggs, 1/2 Cup of Sugar, pumpkin, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves.
  5. Beat with a whisk or rotary beater just until combined.
  6. Slowly whisk the hot whipping cream into the egg mixture.
  7. Use a small serrated knife to cut off the top 1/2-inch of the baby pumpkins.
  8. Discard the tops, use the spoon to scoop out the seeds.
  9. Place the pumpkin in a roasting pan.
  10. Divide custard mixture evenly among the pumpkins.
  11. Place roasting pan on oven rack.
  12. Pour enough boiling water into the the roasting pan to reach halfway up the sides of the pumpkins.
  13. Bake 30-40 mins or until the centers appear nearly set when gently shaken.
  14. Carefully remove pan from oven.
  15. Remove pumpkins from water; cool on a wire rack.
  16. Cover and chill for at least 1 hour or up to 8.
  17. Before serving, let custards stand at room temp for about 20 mins.
  18. Meanwhile, for caramelized sugar: in a heavy 8 inch skillet, heat 1/4 cup of sugar over medium high heat until sugar begins to melt, shaking skillet occasionally to heat sugar evenly-do not stir.
  19. Once sugar starts to melt, reduce heat to low, cool 3-5 mins or until all sugar is melted and golden brown, stirring as needed.
  20. Quickly drizzle sugar over the custards. (If sugar starts to harden in skillet, return to heat, stirring until melted.)
  21. Serve immediately.
  22. ***Instead of caramelizing the sugar in a pan, you can sprinkle the sugar evenly over the custards and use a culinary torch.

 

I’m not a Crème Brûlée type person, but everyone loved it!

For more from The Magician’s Nephew Tea Party/Book Club, go to Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites

For more recipes, go to Ham, Cheddar, and Apple Tea Sandwiches

For more desserts, go to Lemon Gingerbread Cake

For more tea posts, go to How the Queen Found the Perfect Cup of Tea

For more pumpkin recipes, go to Harvest Pumpkin Scones

How the Queen Found the Perfect Cup of Tea

So usually I only review Jane Austen books, or ones related to it (Catherine Morland’s Reading List  or Non-Austen Reads for Austen Readers for example). But I saw this picture book in the library and thought it was too cute not to share.

And at cookies!

So the story starts with a grumpy queen who hates her cup of tea and sets off to find the perfect cup of tea.

She starts off in Japan meeting a little girl named Noriko, cuddles some kittens, and learns how to make Matcha tea.

Then to India where she meets Sunil and they play ball and make Chai Tea.

After that she journeys onto Turkey where she meets Rana, dances, and makes Turkish tea.

After all her adventures, she heads home where she makes a cup of English tea and thinks.

She then decides to hold a tea party and invites her new friends-having learned that true happiness comes from having someone to share a cup of tea with.

It is such an adorable book and introduces children to fun, friendship, and four different ways of making tea.

And eat scones!

For more tea posts, go to Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites

For more children’s books, go to Little Literary Classics Mansfield Park Cloth Book

For more on Matcha tea, go to Blueberry Matcha Smoothie

For more on Chai tea, go to I Won the Kumi Crochet and Tea India Giveaway

The Magician’s Nephew Tea Party/Book Club: Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites

So every Wednesday, starting in October, I have been a part of a Tea Party/Bible Study/Book Club on The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis. This is different from my book club and the Book Club Picks I have been reviewing (and desperately need to catch up on). I also need to catch up on these recipes. Week three we had Organic India Tulsi Masala Chai Tea, Parmesan and Chive Scones, Cucumber Aioli Canapés, Ham, Cheddar, and Apple Tea Sandwiches, Cranberry, Brie, and Rosemary Bites, and Mini Pumpkin Creme Brulee.

I couldn’t share the recipes in October as I was in the middle of Horrorfest IX, so I am catching up and of course next is the side.

And food to go with.

 

This recipe comes from Cheese Curd in Paradise.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Sheet Frozen Puff Pastry, thawed
  • 3/4 Cup of Cranberry Sauce
  • 8 oz Brie Cheese
  • 1-2 Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Using a knife or pizza cutter cut the dough into 12 equal pieces.
  3. Place each piece in a cup of a 12-cup muffin tin. You want each of the four sides to slightly poke over the top of the cup.
  4. Cut the brie into 1-inch pieces, place a piece into each cup.
  5. Evenly distribute the cranberry sauce in the cups over the brie. You will use about 1-1.5 tsp per cup.
  6. Pull the rosemary apart so each cup is topped with a small sprig.
  7. Bake for 15 mins.
  8. The puff pastry should be golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow the cups to sit for a few mins to slightly cool.
  9. Use a small butter knife to carefully release the bites from the baking pan.
  10. Serve and enjoy!

So I DO not like brie cheese at all. I didn’t care for these, but everyone else loved them. If you are a brie cheese fan, you’ll love this.

For more from The Magician’s Nephew Tea Party/Book Club, go to Ham, Cheddar, and Apple Tea Sandwiches

For more recipes, go to Cucumber Aioli Canapés

For more tea posts, go to How to Clean Your Tea Infusers

Catherine Morland’s Reading List: The Night Gardener

What is Catherine Morland’s Reading ListThe idea came mostly from the fact that I am a huge Gothic fiction/mystery fan. Before I met Jane Austen I devoured books, (and I still do), that I know, if Catherine Morland was real and alive, she would be reading or interested in reading.

It started with one review, and then before I knew it I had a list of thirty I was planning on reviewing. What can I say, other than:

The Night Gardener by Jonathan Auxier

So I have been wanting to read this book FOREVER. But every time I would check it out, I wouldn’t get a chance-I’d have too many books checked out, things happened, I’m too busy, etc-and I would have to return it.

Finally the stars aligned and I was able to read it. The book is written for middle schoolers and a quick read-made even quicker by the fact that as soon as I started reading it, it sucked me in.

I can’t put the book down

The book takes place during the Irish Potato Famine and two siblings emigrate from Ireland to England to work at a country estate: Kip and Molly. Molly is older and made the arrangements to work, job they are in dire need of as their parents are dead (something Molly has kept hidden from Kip). Molly uses stories to distract and cheer Kip, who is gifted with a green thumb, but suffers from lame leg.

As they travel to the Windsor manor they get stopped by a gypsy fortune teller who tells them the house they are going to is haunted.

Yes, years ago when the current Master Windsor was a boy something killed his family, he was the only one to survive, escaping to family in London. It was very mysterious and strange, and many believe it to be ghosts, a monster, or something.

Kip starts wondering if there is truth to the tales, but Molly ignores it. It can’t be true, she needs it to be not be true as they need these jobs.

Please, oh please! from Death Comes to Pemberley

When they get there, the house is nothing like Molly thought it would be. The house is beautiful but dirty and not kept up at all-things look like they haven’t been washed in forever, there is dust and dirt everywhere, etc.

Haunted house!

There is also a giant, black, gnarled, tree that is connected to the house, as if it grew into it or the house was built into the tree. Looking at it, it makes both Molly and Kip uncomfortable-although they are not sure why.

The family is very unusual, cold, and greedy. Mr. Windsor stutters, has no gumption, and is a pale dark haired man who is constantly trying to get money. He has a secret study that no one is allowed to enter. Constance is cold and harsh toward the “help” as she calls them, in fact she won’t let Kip in the house as her family might catch what he has and become cripples too (her word). She was used to the fine life in London and misses it. She has a ton of rings on her fingers and always seems to be getting more somehow. Very odd as the Windsor family complains about a lack of funds.

Hmm…

The son Alistair is greedy boy who is always eating candy and is cruel to his sister. But where does he get this candy from. He has dark hair like his father and mother.

Penny is the youngest and is greedy for stories and attention, but otherwise is a good child. She is enthralled with Molly’s copper hair, something she used to have. Molly thinks that is odd, even more so when she sees a portrait of them on the wall-all with bright skin, bright colored hair-nothing like the dour, dark haired, and ghostly pale skin they have now.

Hmm…

Kip starts working in the yard and loves growing things, but still feels unease about that tree. But there are things down in the yard he did not do. Things planted. But who could be doing that?

Hmm…

The longer they stay there the harder it is to leave. At night they have bad dreams and hear something stalking in the night. Penny tells Molly of a night man in the house clomping through and going outside. Molly doesn’t believe her…at first, but then one night, she is sneaking her brother into the house and the two see a man-a ghostly, creepy, scary man who works on the yard but espechially with the dark and disturbing tree.

Creepy…

Then Molly discovers a secret. The tree in the house grants you a wish of your heart-but once given it is impossible to stop going back. Constance Windsor had a ring that was worth nothing, but given before Mr. Windsor made money. He sold it when they needed funds and the tree gave her a copy, and she can’t stop trying to get it back.

Alistair’s favorite memory was when his father and him spent the day together and went to a candy store. He can’t stop getting or eating candy, trying to relive the memory. Penny has special books that are stories about her. For Molly she gets letters from her parents, letters that tell of the same stories she has been feeding her brother.

Wow!

But Molly quickly learns to be careful for what you wish for as the price might be more than you want to pay. She too finds herself becoming bound to the tree, her copper hair and imaginative self being sucked away as she waits for more letters. Will Molly and Kip be able to save themselves and the Windsor family? Or will they meet their end?

Hmmm…

I LOVED this book. It was so spooky and reminded me of other Gothic tales I grew up reading. I espechially loved the imagery of the tree feeding on them, stealing their souls essentially, taking from them and they know it is feeding off them-but they can’t stop it.

Creepy…

It was extremely spooky and creepy-just how I like it.

For more from Catherine Morland’s Reading List, go to Secrets of the Heart

For more Gothic Fiction, go to House of Salt and Sorrows