Jane Austen Witty and Wise Coloring Book

Jane Austen Witty and Wise Coloring Book

I was gifted this coloring a book a couple years ago and decided it was time to finally review it.

I have loved coloring books ever since I was a child and I still color today. Coloring is really good for your mental health as it calms your brain and helps your body relax. Coloring can also help you improve sleep and fatigue while decreasing body aches, heart rate, respiration, and feelings of depression and anxiety.

This Jane Austen Witty and Wise Coloring Book has 31 quotes from Jane Austen’s works, with each page full of decorated borders. Each page is perforated and only printed on one side if you want to remove it and frame it.

I really enjoyed it and I recommend it for Jane Austen fans and coloring book enthusiasts. I plan to bring this with me when we go to Ireland this fall as I might need something to entertain me on the plane ride.

I definitely recommend it.

For more Jane Austen stuff, go to MadsenCreations’ New “Spring” Jane Austen Items!

For more on Jane Austen, go to The Making of Pride and Prejudice (1995)

Mr. Darcy’s Valentine

Mr. Darcy’s Valentine by Heather Moll

Today is February 1st, not only the start of the month of love (as February has Valentine’s Day and is Library Lovers’ Month); but also the publication date of Mr. Darcy’s Valentine.

Do you love Pride and Prejudice? Are you looking for a romantic short story to get you in the mood for Valentine’s Day? Then you should definitely include this book in your Valentine’s Day plans.

The story takes place after Bingley has left Netherfield in the original plot. In this adaptation, Jane and Elizabeth have traveled to London to visit the Gardiners. They have been having a nice time, although Jane is still very upset over Mr. Bingley.

Aw!

Caroline has been trying to keep Jane from her family and Mr. Bingley in the dark about Jane being in town; but unfortunately for her when Mr. Darcy and Mr. Bingley go to a concert they spot Jane, Elizabeth, and the Gardiners. Mr. Bingley is back on track to try and win his lady love.

Darcy admits to Bingley that he withheld information from him about Jane being in town; along with apologizing for doing so and for being wrong about Jane’s level of interest in Bingley. Darcy concedes that Jane does truly care for Bingley and is determined to do all he can to help Bingley win his lady love, even throwing a dinner party when he hates to entertain.

When the night of the dinner party arrives, the guests include Elizabeth, Jane, the Gardiners, Mr. Bingley, Caroline Bingley, the Hursts, Colonel Fitzwilliam, and Georgiana. The dinner is a comedic event as every character has their own goal of who they wish to speak to and avoid. Darcy tries to entertain Elizabeth and Georgiana; while avoiding being trapped in conversation by Caroline or the Gardiners (assuming they are like Mr. and Mrs. Bennet). Caroline expends all her attention on the Darcys, Bingley and Jane only have eyes for each other, and Elizabeth tries her hardest to not speak to Darcy and his sister, yet finds most of her conversations happening between them; (and much to her original dismay, actually liking Georgiana.)

Bit of a mess…

When Valentine’s Day is mentioned and a few old superstitious ways to celebrate talked about, Bingley gets the idea to “draw lots” for a Valentine and have the men write one for the women. Bingley cares deeply for Jane and even though Darcy had come around to agreeing that Jane cares for Bingley, Bingley still feels uncertain. With this “Valentine’s Day” game, rigged of course so he could get Jane, Bingley feels he’ll be able to see if she would accept his proposal. Darcy isn’t interested in playing, but after they agree that Georgina will not take part (she’s much too shy) and that Darcy will not have to write Caroline’s Valentine, he submits and the Valentines are written.

Bingley writes a lovely note and Jane reciprocates.

How sweet!

Colonel Fitzwilliam writes a silly one that Caroline doesn’t enjoy.

The real trouble arises with Darcy’s Valentine. He writes an incredibly sweet one:

I am a gentleman by birth—

With a fortune to boast.

Yet of all women upon earth,

Thee I admire and love the most.

Thou art accomplish’d, quite refined—

Far more than others of your line.

Then, since thou’rt suited to my mind,

Pray be my valentine.

From Mr. Darcy’s Valentine by Heather Moll
Soooo cute!!!!

But while I find it romantic, Elizabeth finds offense in every line. She pens a reply that thoroughly rejects him and gives him a real what for about his behavior when he asks her for an explanation.

While Darcy is taken aback with how she sees him and amazed that she views him so poorly, he is determined to show her that the judgement she made of him is wrong, and he does it in the best way possible: he tries to be a better person.

While Darcy has stepped out to compose himself after being rejected, Caroline taunts Elizabeth about Wickham, in front of Georgiana. On hearing Wickham’s name Georgiana becomes very upset and to save her, Elizabeth contrives an excuse for the two to leave the room. While separated from the others, Georgina reveals all that occurred between her and Wickham. Elizabeth is in shock over the tale, and even more so over how she misjudged the two men…and embarrassed over how she insulted Darcy.

What makes things even worse and awkward, as Bingley and Jane are courting, Darcy and Elizabeth are thrown together constantly. But the more time Elizabeth spends with Darcy the more she realizes how fine a man he is. Will it be too late for her?

Or will she be able to find a way to show him how much she cares by Valentine’s Day?

As always, Heather Moll wrote a real page turner that is a charming tale from beginning to end. If you are looking for a romantic read featuring Austen’s characters this story is a must! It was an absolute delight and something I know I will be rereading every February.

If you are a Jane Austen fan it’s perfect to add to your collection, and if you are looking for something Jane Austen-y to purchase for your Valentine, this book would make a perfect gift.

For more by Heather Moll, go to An Appearance of Goodness

For more Pride and Prejudice, go to The Making of Pride and Prejudice (1995)

For more Pride and Prejudice adaptions, go to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: A Book-to-Table Classic by Martha Stewart

For more Jane Austen adaptations, go to Jane Austen Children’s Stories: Pride and Prejudice

For more Valentine’s Day posts, go to How to Throw a Valentea Party

The Making of Pride and Prejudice (1995)

Happy 210th birthday to Pride and Prejudice

To celebrate this anniversary, I have decided to review a Pride and Prejudice themed book, film, or item at least once a month throughout the year.

One thing I decided to do was finally review Pride and Prejudice (1995) I was originally going to wait for its 30th anniversary but decided, why wait?

But before I can review the episodes, I decided to first read and review The Making of Pride and Prejudice (1995), a book that was included with my special DVD box set.

The Making of Pride and Prejudice by Sue Britwistle & Susie Conklin

What I found extremely interesting was that the spark to creating one of the best adaptions of Jane Austen all came about due to Northanger Abbey. Isn’t that cute? Sue Bristwhistle (producer) and Andrew Davies (writer) were watching a screening of one of the worst Jane Austen adaptions, Northanger Abbey (1986), when Andrew Davies broached the topic of creating a filmed version was the catalyst to one of the mose beloved Jane Austen adaptions.

Although it wasn’t easy. The book begins with Sue Bristwhistle sharing how it took quite a bit of time to garner the interest and how they had to face off against people who didn’t think it would come out well.

I really enjoyed this book as it is extremely detailed from every step of creating it: scriptwriting, casting, costumes, locations, editing, makeup, filming, food, editing, sound mixing, PR, etc. It’s really worth it for any Austen fan and Pride and Prejudice (1995) fan.

There were a few things I absolutely enjoyed reading in this book. First Andrew Davies thoughts on writing the script. He has said that he loved the book, it was one of his favorites and you can see how much he adores it and is a fan in this. I love how he points out the cleverness of Austen’s writing and how great she is at plotting her works.

“Because the book [Pride and Prejudice] is so tight – her [Jane Austen’s] plot works just like a Swiss clock and doesn’t have any flabby bits in it – everything counts.”

-Andrew Davies in “The Script” from The Making of Pride and Prejudice

I feel like most studios struggle with this when it comes to adapting Jane Austen works and this seems to be the biggest complaint Austen fans make about the adaptions. Studios slice too much and important plot points are lost, characters are nonexistent, and crucial scenes of the novels are now flat in the film.

I do feel that this is something that makes this adaptions superior to many others, Andrew Davies really loved the original work and did his most to try and keep Austen’s spirit; while at the same time trying to make sure he had something that would appeal to all viewers.

One thing I really appreciate is that Davies wanted to give us a view into the men of the novel and as to what they think and do. With a novel you have more leeway to have a mysterious character, fully based on what our main characters view then as; but in a TV show most people want to know more about these people and who they are if they are planning to come back every week to watch.

Also the Pemberley diving in scene is such a crucial scene to understanding and. Darcy we we finally see him wiping away the structures of society and instead being able to really “be” himself.” And of course has been a fan favorite.

The casting chapter I also found very interesting as it is so important to find the right people for period pieces.

“So we were looking for wit, charm and charisma, but also for the ability to “play” that period. Some people simply can’t do it; everything
about them is too modern. It’s a difficult thing to analyse; there are a
lot of good young actors and actresses around, but they are just very
twentieth-century and don’t have the right sort of grace. I don’t think
that can be instilled any more than you can train someone to be funny.”

-Janie Forthegill in “Pre-Production” from The Making of Pride and Prejudice

I 100 percent agree. I feel like this a problem today where studios hire people who the think will draw views, even though they just don’t work for the drama. They look or act too modern and make everything feel out of place.

Colin Firth had to dye his hair because he is a blonde, I’m surprised as he looks so good with dark hair.

One of my favorite parts was on the costuming. It was so interesting to read how they had to make all the costumes and get the prints designed and printed on the fabric. A lot of clothes from the previous adaptations were in terrible condition or didn’t work. It was absolutely fascinating and makes sense why the clothes are constantly reused by the studio.

Elizabeth Bennet

There is a section with Colin Firth where he describes his journey to the role and experiences filing and I loved it! In fact it reminded me of my own journey to Jane Austen. I also find it interesting that Firth felt he wasn’t sexy enough when comparing himself to Laurence Olivier. He was extremely afraid everyone would just compare the two and find him lacking. It’s amazing to think of when Olivier isn’t as remembered as Colin Firth. It’s like he threw down a reverse UNO.

I highly recommend this for any Austen fans as I think you will really enjoy it, especially if you love the 1995 adaption.

For more on the making of an Austen film, go to The Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries

For more Pride and Prejudice, go to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: A Book-to-Table Classic by Martha Stewart

For more nonfiction, go to Jane Austen (Little People, BIG DREAMS)

For more Colin Firth, go to Modesto Jane Con: Defining the Definitive Darcy and Lizzie

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: A Book-to-Table Classic by Martha Stewart

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: A Book-to-Table Classic by Jane Austen and Martha Stewart

This book came out about five years ago and it has been on my to-buy list for a while.

But it no longer has a place on my list as I was blessed with it by my friend for Christmas. After all, books make the best gifts!

When this book first came out Martha Stewart and articles touted it as the “…newly released Fall cookbook Jane Austen diehards could only dream of.” They also claimed that these “…recipes by Martha Stewart will make you want to host a tea even if you aren’t looking to woo a wealthy suitor for one of your many daughters.”

Party time!

From all I heard about it, I really expected it to be the novel with recipes for food mentioned in the book; along with historical info or facts about Jane Austen and the recipes. It was really promoted as the first of its kind, a book to table classic, with the actual Pride and Prejudice novel and recipes for the perfect teatime.

This book was not what I was expecting. It wasn’t a bad book but from all that Martha Stewart talked it up I was expecting more recipes. Something more along the lines of the The Mitford Cookbook or The Betty Crocker Celebrate Cookbook.

The first thing that surprised me with this book is that there is no foreword about Martha Stewart’s love of Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, or why she even wanted to make this book.

Hmm…?

The book goes right into the novel with recipes put here and there. The recipes are:

  • Sugar-and-Spice Cake
  • Linzer Hearts
  • Cream Scones with Currants
  • Rosemary Pound Cakes
  • Petits Fours
  • Chocolate Shortbread Fingers
  • Old-Fashioned Berry Layer Cake
  • French Almond Macaroons
  • Fruit Turnovers
  • Gingerbread Icebox Cake
  • Lemon Madeleines
  • Hazelnut Cookies

The other thing that surprised me is that there is nothing in here why she picked these recipes or why they would be perfect for a Pride and Prejudice cookbook. These recipes aren’t ones mentioned in the novel and some are interesting choices, like the icebox cake, which was made popular in the 1920s. Why is that perfect for a Pride and Prejudice tea party?

For someone, who according to her author bio, “is America’s most trusted expert and teacher and the author of more than ninety books on cooking, entertaining, crafts, homekeeping, gardens, weddings, and decorating”; I excepted more. Unfortunately I don’t think as much effort went into this as could have been implemented. It makes me wonder if they moved up the publication date to cash in on holiday sales and then weren’t able to add all the extras.

Even though I’m a little disappointed in Martha Stewart as this wasn’t what I was expecting or how they marketed it I still like that this was a wonderful gift from my friend, is another book to add to my Jane Austen collection (and Pride and Prejudice collection), and am looking forward to trying out some of these recipes.

For more Pride and Prejudice, go to Jane Austen Children’s Stories: Pride and Prejudice

For more Pride and Prejudice adaptions, go to Christmas at Pemberley Manor (2018)

For more Jane Austen adaptations, go to An Appearance of Goodness

For more recipes, go to Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato Tea Sandwiches

If Adventures Will Not Befall a Young Lady in Her Own Village, She Must Seek Them Abroad

Happy New Year!

So even though this year is the 210th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice.

I went with a Northanger Abbey quote because I am going abroad to Ireland in the fall!!! I’m so excited!

But even though I am deciding to make this my “Catherine Morland” year (I’m coming for you Mr. Tilney)-I do plan to try and review/post something Pride and Prejudice related every month. Now I know I failed in reviewing Emma (1972)-but I’m really going to try and do my best!

Now on to the year in review!

The Views

This year I had over 56,000 views! That might not seem like a lot to some but I’m thankful for each and every one.

Thank you!

The Top Five Posts

Here are the top five most viewed posts of the year, although again none were posted this year. I guess whatever I post in the actual year is never popular enough? Who knows.

5) I Ran Out of Milk So I Put Buttermilk in My Tea from 2019

This was just a silly post, I’m surprised it was so popular this year.

4) A Real Man from 2014

Why is this post so popular? I don’t know, but once again it’s in my top 5.

3) Which Husband Ran Off With Addie Ross?: A Letter to Three Wives (1949) from Horrorfest VII from 2018

This is a fantastic film and I know it is one of the top viewed as people are always trying to find out which husband ran off with Addie Ross. The answer lies in my review.

2) What Happened to Ally Palmer?: The Good Student (2006) from Horrorfest VII from 2018

When I first saw this film with my friend I was confused. Ever since I have reviewed it, the review has been read by fellow confused viewers.

1) Fulfilling the List: A Walk to Remember (2002) from I Only Want To Be With You: Romance is in the Air from 2013

Ever since I have posted this it has been my number one viewed post. For 10 years nothing has been able to knock it out of first place. I’m extremely surprised.

First of all I celebrated my 10th Blogiversary! I’ve been doing this for 10 years! Can you believe that?!

Jane Austen Posts

It’s the name of the blog, of course there will be posts on Jane Austen or her works!

Pride and Prejudice:

Sense and Sensibility:

Emma:

Northanger Abbey:

Persuasion:

Jane Austen and the Regency Era:

Non-Austen Films for Austen Fans

Have you watched every version of Jane Austen’s works in film and TV and now wonder what to watch next? That’s why I started making a list of films that have components similar to Jane Austen’s works but not an exact retelling or a variation.

Spill the Tea, Tea Reviews

Reviews of tea shops, cafes, & more!

Recipes:

Who doesn’t love having a nice teatime snack to eat while reading or watching Jane Austen?

Crafts:

I’m going to try and share any regency, Jane Austen, or tea related crafts!

Non-Austen Reads for Austen Readers:

What do you read after you’ve read all of Jane Austen’s works? That’s why I started making a list of books that have components similar to Jane Austen’s works but are not an exact retelling or a variation.

Giveaway Reviews:

Who doesn’t like free things?

Catherine Morland’s Viewing List

Similar to Catherine Morland’s Reading List, this is a list of gothic films I recommend for the Henry Tilneys and Catherine Morlands out there who are looking for something spooky to watch.

Catherine Morland’s Reading List

Similar to Non-Austen Reads for Austen Readers this is a list of gothic books I recommend for the Henry Tilneys and Catherine Morlands who are looking for something spooky to read.

Horrorfest XI

31 reviews of horror films, mysteries, monsters, etc; and of course Northanger Abbey.

Instagram Stuff

On Instagram (@janeaustenrunsmylife) I try to achieve a Bookish Bingo every month. I usually read whatever I like and then see which slot it fills. I write how it fits the categories in my stories and save them for the month and the one after, replacing it with the new month’s selections. It is a lot of fun, and I recommend trying it out.

I also did a countdown to Halloween by reading a chapter of Northanger Abbey everyday, created 31 Days of Hallotean countdown to Halloween, and a countdown to Christmas with my Advent calendar the 25 Teas of Christmas.

July Blogiversary

I celebrated my 10th Blogiversary this year, my niece and I reviewing Austenland. Thank you to all who have been a part these past 10 years. Also on my Instagram I asked a series of questions and posted the results. I asked the following questions this year:

  • If Austen characters could have any food we have today, which one do you think they would go the most crazy over?
  • If the Jane Austen characters were alive today, what jobs would they have?
  • If you could cast any actor/actress in a Jane Austen production, who would it b
  • If you could cast any actor (alive or dead) as Mr. Darcy, who would
  • If you couldn’t marry one of Jane Austen’s Main Characters/love interests, which character would you marry?
  • If you were to make a modern adaption of Jane Austen, which book would you pick and what changes would you make to have it be ‘modern’
  • Jane Austen opinion you will never be talked out of?
  • What are your top 5 Jane Austen adaptions/retellings?
  • What is a Jane Austen themed tradition, oddity, or eccentricity you have/have in your family?
  • What is the best Austen themed product you have purchased or been gifted?
  • What is your favorite Jane Austen book cover?
  • What Pop Culture thing would the Austen characters be into?
  • What’s your favorite costume/outfit from a Jane Austen film.
  • Which Austen parent is the worst?
  • Which character in Austen’s works do you dislike/hate
  • Which Jane Austen character deserves a novel showcasing them?
  • Which is the worst film or TV adaption of Jane Austen’s work

25 Films of Christmas

I like to watch a Christmas film every day in December. Theses are the ones I watched this year.

That’s it for 2022, here’s hoping 2023 will be better!

For 2021 in review, go to I Always Deserve the Best Treatment, Because I Never Put Up With Any Other

For 2020 in review, go to I Will Be Calm. I Will Be Mistress of Myself

For 2019 in review, go to The Mysterious Affair at Jane Austen Runs My Life

For 2018 in review, go to The Future is Bulletproof

For 2017 in review, go to Life Seems But a Quick Succession of Busy Nothings

For 2016 in review, go to A New Hope

For 2015 in review, go to To Boldy Go Where No Man Has Gone Before

For 2014 in review, go to Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need Roads

For 2013 in review, go to Looking at the Past, Focusing on the Future

For 2012 in review, go to Looking Back, Moving Forward