Brown Butter Matcha Brownies

Do you love Matcha? I do!

And I’m always on the lookout for a new matcha recipe. I discovered this brown butter matcha brownie recipe on Cooking Therapy, last year around Saint Patrick’s day and thought it would be perfect it makes as it is green. Unfortunately, they were out of white chocolate chips and I had to use regular chocolate. It tasted good, but didn’t look very matcha-y. I decided to try it again and make sure this time I had white chocolate.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup unsalted butter browned
  • 4 oz white chocolate
  • 2 tbsp matcha powder
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar
  • 3 eggs room temperature
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp flaky salt optional

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Grease a 8×8 baking pan with butter and line with parchment paper. Set aside.
  3. Heat the butter over high heat until it melts. Lower the heat to low. Heat the butter until small brown bits start to appear. Remove from the stove.
  4. Add white chocolate and matcha powder to a small bowl. Pour the brown butter over the top and stir until all the chocolate melts. Let the mixture cool for 2 minutes.
  5. In large bowl, combine granulated sugar, brown sugar, eggs, vanilla extract, and salt. Beat with a hand mixer or stand mixer until thick and creamy (5-10 minutes).
  6. While mixing, stream in your matcha chocolate ganache from step 4. Whisk until a uniform green batter appears.
  7. Lastly, sift your flour into the bowl. Using a spatula, gently fold the flour into the batter using a until a green batter forms.
  8. Spoon into your prepared baking pan.
  9. Bake for 20-30 minutes.
  10. Take out the brownies and slam them on the counter to get rid of some the air. Sprinkle some flaky sea salt over the top and put the brownies back in the oven. Bake for another 10 minutes.
  11. Let cool for 20 minutes before serving.

This was absolutely delicious and I cannot stop eating it. I had to give it away to family it is so good.

Cannot stop!

For more Matcha recipes, go to Blueberry Matcha Smoothie

For more desserts, go to Applesauce Cake

For more recipes, go to Twice Baked Potatoes

Books, Tea, and the Trinity: Apple Cinnamon Scones

Back in 2020, some friends and I started a Tea Party/Bible Study/Book Club. We met every Wednesday and worked our way through the Chronicles of Narnia and are currently working through the Lorien Legacies. When we started I resolved to share all the recipes, but since then have decided to rework these posts. Instead of having the book we are reading through at the front of the recipe, I’m changing it to be our tea group’s name: Books, Tea, and the Trinity.

After we finished The Magician’s Nephew and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe; the next book in the series was A Horse and His Boy. This book was a bit harder to plan recipes as it didn’t have as many starting off points as The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, but that also meant we could plan whatever we wanted to.

As I wasn’t in charge of this book, there will be no discussion questions, just recipes.

The first week we had Cederberg Tea Co. Classic Red and Red Chai Tea. We also had Apple Cinnamon Scones, Heirloom Tomato Tarts with Basil, and a Waldorf Salad.

This scone recipe comes from the King Arthur Baking Company.

Ingredients:

  • 2 3/4 cups flour
  • 1/3 cup of sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 8 tablespoons of cold unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup fresh apple, in 1/2″ pieces (about half a medium apple)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce

Topping

  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • milk, for brushing

Instructions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and cinnamon.
  2. Add the butter to the mixture in the bowl, until the mixture is unevenly crumbly.
  3. Stir in the chopped apple.
  4. In a separate mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, vanilla, and applesauce.
  5. Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until all is moistened and holds together.
  6. Line a baking sheet with parchment; if you don’t have parchment, just use a baking without greasing it. Sprinkle a bit of flour atop the parchment or pan. Or use your scone pan.
  7. Scrape the dough onto the floured parchment or pan, and divide it in half. Gently pat and round each half into a 5″ to 5 1/2″ circle about 3/4″ thick.
  8. To make the topping, stir together the sugar and cinnamon. Brush each circle with a bit of water or milk, and sprinkle with the topping.
  9. Using a knife, slice each circle into 6 wedges.
  10. Place the pan of scones in the freezer for 30 minutes, uncovered.
  11. While the scones are chilling, preheat the oven to 425°F.
  12. Bake the scones for 18 to 22 minutes, or until they’re golden brown.
  13. Remove the scones from the oven, and cool briefly on the pan.
  14. Enjoy!

These scones were delicious! We instantly devoured them! We had a hard time trying to stop eating.

I also just made them the other day and turned out to be missing some ingredients, having to substitute with more applesauce. The scones were just as good, which is a great marker of the recipe, as the base was strong enough to withstand changes. I highly recommend these scones.

For more from our Books, Tea, and the Trinity tea times, go to Spinach Puffs

For more scone recipes, go to Blueberry Yogurt Oat Scones

For more from the King Arthur Baking Company, go to Snickerdoodles

For more recipes, go to How to Make Royal Milk Tea

For more tea posts, go to Spill the Tea: Caroline’s Coffee Roaster

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Book Club/Tea Party: Spinach Puffs

I am sooo, sooo, sooo behind in these. In October 2020 some friends and I started meeting every Wednesday for a Tea Party/Bible Study/Book Club. We began with The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis, and when we finished moved on to The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. This is different from my book club and the Book Club Picks I have been reviewing (and also desperately need to catch up on). I’ve been sharing all our tea recipes for you too, to try at home.

For the fifth and final week we did the feast with Aslan:

“Meanwhile, let the feast be prepared. Ladies, take these Daughters of Eve to the pavilion and minister to them.”

For this week we had Nobilitea’s Regal Plum (as the Pevensie’s are royalty), French Bread, Sausage Green Bean Potato Casserole, Spinach Puffs, and Strawberry Shortcake.

One thing I will be doing differently here than in my earlier posts, is that I will be sharing discussion questions that your group can discuss as you read and eat. I didn’t post discussion questions in the previous posts on The Magician’s Nephew, as I wasn’t in charge of that book. For discussion questions, click on this link: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Discussion Questions Chapter 10-17.pdfDownload

Let’s spill the tea.

This recipe comes from Gourmandize.

Ingredients:

  • 1 package Puff Pastry Sheets
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1 (10 ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well drained
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

  1. Thaw pastry sheets at room temperature for 40 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Mix 1 egg and water and set aside
  3. Mix remaining eggs, cheese, spinach, onion and parsley
  4. Unfold pastry on lightly floured surface.
  5. Roll each pastry sheet into 12-inch square and cut each into 16 (3-inch) squares
  6. Place 1 tablespoon spinach mixture in center of each square
  7. Brush edges with egg mixture. Fold squares over filling to form triangles
  8. Crimp edges to seal.
  9. Place on baking sheet. Brush with egg mixture
  10. Bake 20 minutes or until golden. Serve warm or at room temperature.

They were righteous and rocked. Haha, you can’t have a post on spinach puffs without mentioning Kronk!

For more from our The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe teas, go to Sausage, Green Bean, Potato Casserole

For more recipes, go to Marmalade Rolls

For more tea posts, go to Spill the Tea: Bubble Tea Station

Feliz Día de Muertos: Celebrando con Mi Ofrenda de Jane Austen

Hoy es Dia de Los Muertos y yo honrando Jane Austen. Lo siento mi Espanol es no bueno. Lucho con Gramática del español

Today is Day of the Dead and I am honoring Jane Austen. Being biracial I love blending of cultures, and thought this year I would blend my background with my love of Jane Austen. I wanted to do a larger, and let’s be honest, more impressive altar, but I just moved and haven’t had a chance to unpack my belongings as my new place needed some extra work done.

If you’ve been reading for a while you probably know this, but for all you who have started following me recently, I am biracial, being half Mexican.

As I am of Mexican descent I celebrate Dia de Los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, and thought this year I would honor Jane Austen. For those of you who might not know of the holiday, I am going to go over a brief history, share how to make your own altar, and how to make pan de Muerto (bread of the dead).

Van y Vienen

Y las ves pasar

Bailan por ahí

Platican por allá…

Es su día

Y van a festejar

They’re coming and they’re going

And you see them passing by.

They’re dancing over here,

They’re chatting over there…

It’s their day

And they’re going to have a good time.

Some people hear day of the dead or see the calaveras (skulls) and think it is a scary holiday; but it is a very sweet and pleasant one. It is a time to gather with your family or friends and remember those who have passed on. Typically one would make an ofrenda, or altar, for a deceased family member, but you can make one for anybody you would like to honor that is no longer with us.

Dia de Los Muertos is an ancient tradition that started in Mexico. Dia de Los Muertos begins on November 1st and ends on November 3rd. The first day, November 1st, is Dia de los Angelitos, when one honors and remembers the children that have passed on. The legend is that their spirits are granted 24 hours on which to reunite with their families. Often on these ofrendas one will leave their favorite toys, games, and food.

November 2nd is Día de los Difuntos, honoring the adults that have passed on. People will lay their favorite things on the altar; along with Pan de Muerto, tequila, and atole. People will talk, laugh, and share stories about their loved ones.

November 3rd is Día de los Muertos, the day that the whole community would get involved, have parades, people dress up as Catrina, etc.


Calaveras (Skulls)

There are a few particular symbols associated with Dia de Los Muertos. First is the calaveras, the skills, which will be made out of sugar, foam, paper, or painted on someone’s face. The skulls are always smiling as they laugh at death (they no longer have any fear as they have moved on) and are happy to be with their families again. The skulls are also a memento mori, reminding us that we too will die-but in this case they are a cheerful reminder; letting us know that we will all be together again someday.

Most celebrations will have Flor de Muerto, flowers of the dead, which are bright Orange and red marigolds. Marigolds symbolize beauty, the fragility of life, and are used as a way to make a path to guide the dead.


La Catrina

Another symbol of Dia de Los Muertos is La Catrina. Even though the calacas figures (Day of the Dead skeletons) were a part of Dia de Los Muertos, the Catrina figure used today has only been around for about 100 years. José Guadalupe Posada was a controversial Mexican artist who liked to draw satirical cartoons with people as skeletons. He drew the first Catrina in a negative sketch against Porfirio Diaz, the President of Mexico, who was really bringing the country to ruin. (My great grandfather fought along Pancho Villa to try to roust Diaz out, and later ended up immigrating to America.) This image of Catrina wasn’t turned into a popularized one connected to Dia de Los Muertos until the 1940s when Diego Rivera did a mural about the history of Mexico. Now you see Catrinas every year.


The Ofrenda (The Altar)

There are as many ways to make an ofrenda as there is imagination. You can make it any way you desire, but there are a few key things to include. You need a table or box to be your altar, one that you can have set out for days. You also need to have a picture of the person you would like to celebrate, it’s best to put it in the center of your display where all can see it right away. You should also include objects that symbolize what they liked or did in life. You can also decorate with sugar skulls, papel picado, Pan de Muerto, and hot chocolate.

For my ofrenda I have my Jane Austen Catrina pumpkin as my centerpiece as I couldn’t find my picture. I also haven’t unpacked my Jane Austen items so it only has Pride and Prejudice and Northanger Abbey. I also included my faux quill pen and my corona de flores, that I made for dia de Los Muertos. I also have my Jane Austen Catrina mug made by MadsenCreations, MadsenCreations té de Rosa azucar (for dia de Los Muertos), and one of the Pan de Muerto I made a few weeks ago (and froze for the occasion).


Pan de Muertos

This was my first year making Pan de Muertos as I was always scared to try it as it seems difficult. But it is just as easy as making scones. I used the recipe from Mexico in my Kitchen. Although I did do a few substitutions.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups All Purpose flour
  • 2 Tablespoons active-dry yeast
  • ½ cup of Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Cup of butter at room temperature + 1/4 cup to brush the bread after baking.
  • 1 Cup of unsalted margarineroom temperature plus more for bowl and pans.
  • 4 large eggs room temperature
  • Orange zest from 2 oranges
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • Zest of 1 orange or 1 teaspoon orange blossom water or orange essence
  • 1 large egg lightly beaten to brush the bread
  • Sugar to decorate the bread at the end.

Directions:

  1. Place the 4 eggs, margarine, salt and half of the sugar in a large bowl.
  2. Mix the dough, working it for about 2 minutes.
  3. Add the All-purpose flour in small amounts alternating with the water. Add the dry active yeast and mix until well combined.
  4. Continue now by adding one at a time the butter, the orange zest, the rest of the sugar and the orange blossom essence or extra orange zest, mixing well after each addition until soft dough forms.
  5. Get the dough out of the mixer bowl and place onto work surface; knead until smooth, dusting work surface lightly with flour as needed if the dough begins to stick. Knead for a couple more minutes.
  6. Coat the interior of a large bowl with margarine; transfer dough to bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let stand in a warm place until it doubles in size, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  7. Transfer the dough from the bowl onto working surface, separate a portion of the dough to form the decorative bones later on. Cut the rest of the dough into two equal pieces. Prepare 2 greased baking sheets, set aside.
  8. Take portions of the dough and place in the palm of your hand, shaping each piece into a tight ball rolling the dough on the surface. This is called “bolear” in Spanish. Place on prepared baking sheets 2 inches apart. Press the dough slightly.
  9. Take the remaining dough set aside and roll into small logs putting a little pressure with the fingers to form the bones. You need 2 for each bread.
  10. Place the bones on top of each roll, forming a cross.
  11. And finally, with the leftover dough form small balls and put the ball in the center. Cover baking sheets with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place, 1 ½ to 2 hours.
  12. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  13. Add a pinch of salt to our mix of egg and water and brush the buns before placing in the oven. Transfer buns to oven and bake until golden brown, 15 to 17 minutes.
  14. Transfer to a wire rack and cool to room temperature.
  15. Once your Pan de Muerto bread has a completely cooled brush with the remaining butter and then dust with sugar.

I struggled with shaping them, but this video helped a lot.

I had Flat Jane when I made them and then I froze them so they would be ready for today.

Feliz dia de Los Muertos!

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Tea Party/Book Club: Honey French Toast

So last October, every Wednesday, I have been a part of a Tea Party/Bible Study/Book Club. We started on The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis, and when we finished moved on to The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. This is different from my book club and the Book Club Picks I have been reviewing (and desperately need to catch up on).

Thats me

One thing I will be doing differently here than in my earlier posts, will be sharing discussion questions that your group can discuss as you read and eat. I didn’t post discussion questions in the previous posts on The Magician’s Nephew, as I wasn’t in charge of that book. For discussion questions, click on this link.

So this book made choosing the recipes extremely easy as they have several meals. For our first tea, we were inspired by what Lucy and Mr. Tumnus have together.

“Meanwhile,” said Mr. Tumnus, “it is winter in Narnia, and has been for ever so long, and we shall both catch cold if we stand here talking in the snow. Daughter of Eve from the far land of Spare Oom where eternal summer reigns around the bright city of War Drobe, how would it be if you came and had tea with me?”…

Now, Daughter of Eve!” said the Faun. And really it was a wonderful tea. There was a nice brown egg, lightly boiled, for each of them, and then sardines on toast, and then buttered toast, and then toast with honey, and then a sugar-topped cake. And when Lucy was tired of eating the Faun began to talk. 

The first week we had Chami Teas Winter Grey: Deviled Eggs (for brown egg lightly boiled); Salmon, Cucumber, and Radish Canapés (in place of sardines on toast); Bagels (buttered toast), Honey French Toast (for toast with honey); and a Bear Claw Coffee Cake (for sugar topped cake).

This recipe comes from Farm Flavor.

Party time!

Ingredients:

  • 2 Eggs, well beaten
  • ¼ cup milk
  • ¼ cup Honey
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 6-8 slices Bread
  • butter, for frying

Directions:

  1. Combine eggs, milk, honey, and salt.
  2. Dip bread slices into honey mixture.
  3. Melt butter in a large skillet. Fry in butter over medium heat until golden brown, turning once.

These were delicious and a great addition to any tea party. I don’t really like honey, but I really enjoyed these.

And eat scones!

For more recipes, go to Salmon, Cucumber, and Radish Canapés

For more recipes, go to Snickerdoodles

For more tea posts, go to Jane Austen Birthday Party: Party Favors II